Archives For Tips

Having A Baby I regularly get asked how I achieve the look in my photography.

I start with incredibly flexible, albeit low contrast, monochrome RAW files from my Leica Monochrom. London is saturated with brick, tarmac and concrete, so my post processing will frequently separate foreground objects from the scene. The reason is the structure slider in Silver Efex Pro. Pushing structure in faces and fluid objects works well, but not so for concrete. Example below.

HiLoStructure

And this brings me to Photoshop. I work in layers and whilst I believe Lightroom will allow me to find the same end result, it’s not easy to ‘stand back’ and appraise the current image of stacked layers and tweak their individual opacities until I’m happy with the composite image.

What now follows, is a layer by layer build up of this image. All processing is achieved in Silver Efex Pro 2, because I’m lazy, and Photoshop CS6. So this is essentially the low contrast image from my camera. In the Adobe Camera Raw dialogue I’ve dialled down the highlights a little and brightened the blacks.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.27You can click on these images to see a larger version.

I’ll place myself to shoot with the best light I can, but it’s infrequent a ‘moment’ occurs that I can get into position for, if there’s a better position at all. This being the case, I will often have to process subjects specifically to boost their light.

First, for this shot, I’m concerned about getting the sidewalk and building correct. I like to make London’s concrete look cleaner than it usually is. See below.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.33

I chose a lowish structure filter from the Modern section and increased the soft contrast, boosted contrast whites and decreased structure. You can still see the bubblegum, but the scene is lighter, less cracks and stains.

The guy is not doing well with this filter and this is often the case where filters are great for one portion of the scene, but not elsewhere.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.37

Again, from SEP2’s Modern section – the first high structure filter I think – I increased the soft contrast a little. I’ve applied a mask to the man. He’s brighter and with a nice texture in his clothes.

I duplicated this layer, adding a mask, for the window panes. I bang up the contrast and structure on any reflective surface. There’s nothing worse than dull lifeless surfaces that should shine and reflect the world. High contrast!

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.40

Tell me those windows don’t look better?!

Still not happy about his face and arms, so I’m going for even more structure and slight increase in exposure.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.45

Same filter, higher structure, boosted fine structure and overall brightness a little and a layer mask for his face and arms. This layer is not 100% opacity though. The effect should be subtle and Photoshop allows me to view the compound image and adjust opacities for each and every layer concurrently.

I know some would stop here, but I prefer my photography high contrast and, on a wall, it has greater impact. This means additional contrast layers.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.48

The guy’s exposure is pretty low compared to the scene, so the first contrast layer is masked for everywhere but him. I use a low contrast Modern filter usually, boosting the whites and softening the shadows. negative structure. Then set the layer’s blend mode to hard light.

He does need contrast and I’d like to focus the viewer on him, so I’ll employ another contrast layer on the entire scene. Using SEP2’s Vintage Pinhole filter, grain off, brightness down and increased soft contrast to change the light in the centre of the scene. Layer blend mode to hard light again.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.51

This is the effect I was after. Slightly de-emphasising the edges, even whiter walls and a controlled level of contrast on the guy.

Never trusting monitors, I always perform a Image>Adjustments>Levels (Auto) check. It slightly brightened the scene, which I’m happy with. I also sharpen the image in preparation for print.

Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 09.22.54

Flatten the image and duplicate the image twice. The first additional layer, perform a High Pass filter of 4.0 and set the layer blend mode to overlay and opacity to 20%.

To the second addition layer, perform a High Pass filter of 2.0 and set the layer blend mode to overlay and opacity to 20% again.

And flatten the image. I keep the PSD for print runs, but create a smaller jpeg for the internet.

How this image ended up is not to everyone’s taste, but the take home is that I could process what I wanted and subsequently tweak the opacity of individual effect layers.

Sorry about the whacky histogram; my cat walked over the keyboard and I need to set that back.

Good luck processing!

The Walls Have Eyes [Explored]
The Walls Have Eyes, #34 on Flickr’s Explore as at June 26, 2014

The majority of photographers whose work I have stumbled across keep a glossy but impractical portfolio page; mine resides at michaeltoye.com. For those photos that are pretty good, but fail to make the portfolio grade, we make use of sites like Flickr and Google+.

Personally, I gravitated towards Flickr because of the community photographer spirit it engenders. In addition to following ‘friends’ whose photos and style you appreciate, you can build a catalogue of your favourite images from others. There are groups you can join to share your images with like minded shooters, for instance, I am subscribed to street photography and Leica groups.

I have been active on Flick for years now, but I do remember it didn’t take long to discover Flickr’s Explore page. Each photo that is uploaded to Flickr is assigned an ‘interestingness’ factor. How ‘interesting’ your photo is depends on numerous factors like visits to your photo and from where, how many and how frequently others comment and favourite your image, etc. Each day the 500 most ‘interesting’ photos are collated and presented as Flickr’s Explore page. I don’t think it’s just ‘interestingness’ that gets you selected for this coveted set as I do know adding your photo to numerous groups actually reduces your chances of making the cut!

Flickr guards the algorithmic secret of interestingness and Explore selection closely, but I can comment on my experiences.

I can be fairly optimistic of Explore selection if I…

  • Upload a photo relatively late in Flickr’s day. I uploaded ‘The Walls Have Eyes’ about 9:30pm GMT, giving Flickr enough time to see some nice statistics on my photo before the new Flickr day starts at Midnight GMT.
  • Don’t add to any groups
  • Get about 15+ favourites and a few comments over the course of the first hour after upload. ‘The Walls Have Eyes’ received 100 views, 20 favourites and 2 comments before the end of the Flickr day.

Obviously the third point is the biggest variable and the principal requisite is that you take a good photograph. If it’s also processed well, it will pop off your contacts’ page for new images from friends.

Time is a factor in your photo’s ‘interestingness’, so remaining on the Explore page requires some beefy stats to roll in. At 9am, ‘The Walls Have Eyes’ is at 5000+ views and 112 favourites and is still at #34. I expect it to drop before lunch, but this can be slowed by adding to numerous groups.

I also know Flickr Explore selection ignores you after a while. At the beginning of the year I managed to get 5 images in 5 consecutive days into Flickr’s Explore. Bear in mind there are only 500 spots between the millions of daily uploads, so it seems only reasonable to ‘ban’ people for a period of time.

Does anyone else have a similar or dissimilar proven pattern for Flickr’s Explore?

 

Happy New Year!!!

I hope your New Year celebrations went well? Did you make any resolutions to better yourself?

Personally, I have 2.

  • Keep Mrs Walker-Toye happy
  • Take every opportunity to make even better street photographs

Regarding No. 1, mind your own business ;-)

No. 2.

It’s all very well coming out with this bold, “…make even better street photographs”, but maybe it’s as simple as looking at your images and assessing why yours don’t look as good as those images from a.n.other street photographer you know. Can it be opportunity?

One substantial tip I can offer is to ‘take the shot’.

I’m serious. If you are walking by an interesting scene – obviously you have a camera! – stop and take the shot. Walk back, go down the side alley and take the shot! Cross the road and, yes… take the shot!

I’ve seen a few situations where walking on was a very sensible idea and, for safety reasons, I don’t regret not getting the photo. BUT, if you walk by and think, “that would have been a good photo”, then you and I are disappointed in you!

Confidence is the single biggest factor impeding your progress as a street photographer.

I can talk technicalities, composition and framing, and yes they’re significant but if you didn’t get in there and take the photo, it’s all for nothing.

This year, I challenge you to be bold. Get closer. Frame and shoot with confidence.

And don’t forget to smile when you get caught by the subject… which you will ;)

This tutorial actually covers every type of image, color or black and white. For landscape, you might process the sky alternately from land but, this process is especially relevant to Leica Monochrom shooters who work on monochrome files from the start.

Black and white imagery is simple and the power of an image comes through the composition, but the instantaneous impact is down to the dark room process. Imagine Ansel Adams’ photography without the beautiful contrast work he employed to varying degrees and sections of each and every one of his photographs? Great photos, still, but so much less impact.

I will work through an example to show how I utilize masking, within Photoshop, to get the best from the major areas in an image. It’s not a great composition, so apologies up front.

This image above is straight from the camera. No in camera settings applied, so it is tragically bland. Thankfully the Monochrom files retain immense levels of detail.

There are 3 areas to concentrate on.

  • I want to see a great range of soft tones in the woman and with a good level of contrast, but not so much she looks hollowed out
  • The window display is behind glass and I tend to process reflective areas harshly with great clarity and contrast
  • The masonry work should look worn, but still bright. This means very little clarity/structure

The image below is processed for the woman, but the window display is lack lustre and the masonry looks the worse for wear.

This next image is processed for the window display, but the harsh nature of the process leaves the woman over ‘processed’ and the masonry is just awful.

And lastly, below, we have processed for the masonry work and brought back some of its majesty, whilst reflecting age and wear.

Photo manipulation is probably off somewhere celebrating a near 100th anniversary, so I can have my cake and eat it!!

A warning for you color photoshoppers – your selection accuracy for the purposes of layer masking should be a lot more accurate than the ‘mostly accurate’ method I show here for monochrome work.

You should have all your specific layers stacked in a single image within photoshop. Having only processed them, they should all be down to the pixel aligned ;-)

Remember with layer processing that the topmost layer will be seen first and, if set to 100% opacity, you won’t see anything under it!

I will select the masonry from the ‘Masonry’ layer first and I will not select round the woman’s legs because she will be the topmost layer!

I will use the selection tool to select the masonry.

Click to show the Refine Selection dialogue.

It’s clearer to me to have unselected portions of the image highlighted in red. Click on the ‘View’ drop down to select this option.

I simply use the brush tool to ‘paint’ my selection edges and let Photoshop find the ‘edges’ for me.

You should end up with a more elegant selection edge, like so…

With the ‘Masonry’ layer selected, I can simply click on the ‘Mask’ button…

… and Photoshop will create my mask based upon my refined edge selection!

The layer should now have a mask applied. Black areas will not show, but white will. Shades between black and white, within the mask, will be grades of opacity depending on how near they are to black or white.

Here are the layer masks, clearly showing woman, on top hehe, window display and masonry work…

… resulting in our final image. Click on it for a larger 1600 pixel version.

Again, apologies for the choice of image, but we have a clear demonstration that a single image wide process will not provide desired results but, with layer masking, we are allowed to process elements of the image however we wish.

 

Winter Is Coming!

November 12, 2013 — Leave a comment

Barflies
While the inclement winter weather rolls in I will still be out there photographing London’s streets.

Of course, the dynamic of people photography changes slightly with them not actually wanting to be outdoors, but great photos are still there to be had. We street photographers just need to work a little bit harder ;-)

With this in mind, here are my tips for keeping you productive out there in the freeze!

  • Lined, fingerless gloves are essential for keeping as much of your hands warm whilst retaining dexterity.
  • Lip salve certainly prevents my lips from splitting.
  • Good footwear is essential year round however, in winter conditions, I recommend well polished leather shoes or boots or breathable waterproof equivalents.
  • In addition, and again this is year round, I recommend Sorbothane style impact gel insoles. They make the difference between sore knees the next day or not!
  • Clothing wise I wear layers and, on the coldest days, a long sleeve thermal top – Marks & Spencer stock my favourite.
  • Minimise condensation in your camera when moving indoors to a much warmer environment by putting your camera back in your pack before going inside. Leave it in there to acclimatise slowly.
  • Batteries drain far more quickly in the cold, so have at least one fully charged spare.
  • I carry ziplock bags sized for my phone and batteries and camera. There will be a time when the heavens open and you will be caught 10 minutes from the nearest transport. You won’t mind getting soaked knowing your kit is dry.

Street photography is still fun in zero degrees, but only when you’re prepared for it!

MW-T Pro Mono Workflow sml

Just to let you all know, I will be bringing out a DVD with a series of video tutorials for the conversion of colour images to black and white.

The videos will cover conversion to monochrome with, or without, tools such as Silver Efex Pro 2.

There will be instruction on dealing with conversion of portions of the image using accurate pro level masking.

At least half the instruction will deal with the production of exhibition quality black and white.

Initially, focus will be on working with Photoshop. Shortly after I will release videos for achieving these results in Lightroom.

Example conversion styles below…

Generations [Explored]

Impressed

Best Friends Forever

Hard Sell On The Vintage Cameras

Calm

 

There may be some teaser videos during October, but stay tuned.

Michael

I’ve had my Monochrom for a while now, in excess of 5000 captures and I have a solid workflow; I can produce the image I thought about at capture time.

This is a significant point and raises a question for all of you.

Do you visualise the final image when you first see the scene to be captured?

I do and it’s the principal reason I have a good percentage of keepers. A large part of this is knowing that a composition won’t work but, in no small part, visualising the final image means I’ve already processed the image before I get to the computer.

I’ve already written a piece on how I process images from the Monochrom and here you can find Leica Monochrom Workflow.

Has anything changed?

I have a better understanding of how the contrast blend modes, Soft and Hard Light, affect my images. This means I choose and manipulate Silver Efex Pro 2 filters more accurately to achieve the contrast I need. That’s definitely down to practise.

And I have a new sharpening technique, which I will detail in this post.

It’s probably best to work through an example. Here’s an image, as exposed, but resized.

Images straight from the Monochrom are simply exposures. All the detail and tones are in there and they just need manipulation.

Personally, I use Photoshop CS6 and Silver Efex Pro 2. It really saves time, but do be careful as it can be misused. For example, High Structure filters will texturise the walls and paved floor so much so the scene will look like a nuclear bunker.

The first layer is a base layer, 017 Full Spectrum. Structure +45 and Dynamic Brightness +30.

Here’s an important distinction with SEP2. If you start the filter program from the floating toolbox window, SEP2 will take your entire image and flatten it. That’s what you will work with.

If you select a layer, in Photoshop, and then go through the menus, Filters > Nik Software > Silver Efex Pro 2, you will only work on the selected layer within the Nik software.

I always process from the background layer, which was the output from Adobe Camera Raw. Always.

Select the background layer, through the menu go to SEP2 and I choose the 023 Wet Rocks Filter. Film Type to Neutral. Dynamic Brightness +30, Midtone Brightness +15, Contrast +10, Structure +25. All other settings remain untouched.

I chose Wet Rocks because its higher structure lends itself well as a contrast layer.

You have to move this new layer to the top and to set its Blend mode to ‘Soft Light’.

This is already a better result, but it’s too dark. Did you know…

A Curves Layer set to a Blend Mode of Screen, opacity 40%, is basically an extra stop of exposure.

I want to concentrate the viewer’s gaze on people in the centre of the image, so I will apply a mask to this curves layer, which will look like this in the layer palette.

To get the radial mask effect, use the Gradient Fill and select the Radial Gradient.

You can also cheat a little and imply more contrast than there is by adding a further contrast layer to the outside using an inverse radial gradient mask!

Duplicate the Soft Light contrast layer and set it to Hard Light.

Apply the mask we just talked about. Invert the mask in Images > Adjustments… > Invert

I’m happy with the process, so far, and I will double check exposure levels by going into Image > Adjustments… > Levels. Click on Auto with the preview ticked to see how much the image levels change. My monitor is calibrated and so i don’t usually see much difference. It’s a good basic indicator you have missed exposure though!

Do not underestimate the effect of correct sharpening. If applied correctly the viewer shouldn’t really be aware of it. Not enough or too much will be quite obvious.

Here’s what I do.

Flatten all the existing layers from processing. Now duplicate this one layer 3 times!
For each of these new layers, apply the High Pass Filter, then set to Blend Mode Overlay…
First layer – Not the base layer! – High Pass, Radius 4.0 pixels. Layer opacity 20%.
Second layer, High Pass, Radius 2.0 pixels. Layer opacity 20%.
Third layer, High Pass, Radius 1.0 pixels. Layer opacity 40%.

Flatten the image and you can now resize for screen. My images, landscape, are set to 1600 pixels and I use the ‘Bicubic (Best for smooth gradients)’

If you didn’t work in sRGB, which the Monochrom uses so this shouldn’t be an issue, convert the color space to sRGB. Also convert the image to 8 bit.

Here is my final JPEG image.

Cynical Father

Please send questions if I’ve not explained anything sufficiently. And, of course, there are a good number of ways to process the Monochrom’s images. This is just my own potion.

Thanks for reading
Michael